What are pure resistive circuits and non-pure resistive circuits?
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What are pure resistive circuits and non-pure resistive circuits?

Posted Date: 2024-02-04

What are pure resistive circuits and non-pure resistive circuits?

Pure resistive circuits and non-pure resistive circuits are two common circuit types that differ in component properties and resistive characteristics.

1. Purely resistive circuit: A purely resistive circuit is composed of a circuit that contains only resistive components and no other components with inductive or capacitive properties. In a purely resistive circuit, the relationship between current and voltage is described by Ohm's law (i.e. V = I * R). Pure resistive circuits are characterized by stable, linear, and no frequency response characteristics. Common purely resistive components include resistors, wires, and resistor networks.

2. Non-pure resistive circuit: A non-pure resistive circuit is a circuit composed of components other than resistance (such as inductors, capacitors or other non-linear components). These nonlinear elements introduce a non-purely resistive nature into the circuit so that the relationship between current and voltage no longer follows simple Ohm's law. Non-pure resistive circuits often have more complex behavior such as frequency response, phase difference, resonance phenomena, etc. Common non-resistive components include inductors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, etc.

Pure resistive circuits and non-pure resistive circuits are only idealized classifications. In actual circuits, there are often interactions between circuit components and complex electrical properties, so there are rarely completely pure resistive circuits or impure resistive circuits. Most circuits include a combination of components to achieve specific functions and goals.

Calculation formulas for pure resistance circuits and non-pure resistance circuits

The calculation formulas for purely resistive circuits and non-pure resistive circuits depend on the specific circuit configuration and component characteristics. Here are some common calculation formulas:

The calculation formulas for purely resistive circuits include:

1. The relationship between current (I) and voltage (V): According to Ohm's law, the relationship between current and voltage can be expressed by the following formula: V = I * R, where V is voltage (unit: volt), I is the current (in amps) and R is the resistance (in ohms).

2. Power consumption of a resistor (P): The power consumption of a resistor in a purely resistive circuit can be expressed by the following formula: P = I^2 * R, or P = V^2 / R, where P is the power (in watts) .

The calculation formulas for non-resistive circuits vary depending on the specific components and topology of the circuit. The following are some common calculation formulas for non-pure resistive circuits:

1. Inductance component (L):

- The relationship between voltage and current of an inductive component: V = L * di/dt, where V is the voltage (in volts), L is the inductance (in henries), and di/dt is the rate of change of current.

- Energy storage of the inductive element: E = 0.5 * L * I^2, where E is the energy stored in the inductive element (in joules) and I is the current (in amperes).

2. Capacitive component (C):

- The relationship between the voltage and current of the capacitive element: I = C * dV/dt, where I is the current (in amperes), C is the capacitance (in farads), and dV/dt is the voltage change rate.

- Energy storage of the capacitive element: E = 0.5 * C * V^2, where E is the energy stored by the capacitive element in joules and V is the voltage in volts.

These formulas are just some common examples, and more variables and formulas may be involved in actual circuits. For specific circuit design and analysis, it may be necessary to select appropriate calculation formulas based on the characteristics of the components involved and the circuit topology.

Examples of pure resistive circuits and non-pure resistive circuits

Here are some examples of pure resistive circuits and non-pure resistive circuits:

Examples of purely resistive circuits include:

1. Resistor circuit: A circuit consisting of one or more resistors. For example, a simple resistor in series with the power supply forms a simple DC circuit.

2. Resistor network circuit: A circuit composed of multiple resistors connected in a specific way (such as series or parallel). Resistor networks are often used in electronic circuits to adjust the resistance value, voltage division or filtering of the circuit.

Examples of circuits that are not purely resistive include:

1. RC circuit: A circuit containing resistors and capacitors. For example, a simple RC circuit can consist of a resistor, a capacitor, and a power supply, and can be used for signal filtering and timing control.

2. RL circuit: A circuit containing resistance and inductance. For example, a simple RL circuit can consist of a resistor, an inductor and a power supply, and can be used for signal filtering or power supply protection.

3. LC circuit: A circuit containing an inductor and a capacitor. For example, a simple LC circuit can consist of an inductor, a capacitor, and a power supply and can be used as an oscillator or filter.

4. RLC circuit: A circuit containing resistors, inductors and capacitors. For example, a simple RLC circuit can consist of a resistor, an inductor, a capacitor, and a power supply, and can be used for filtering, resonance, or oscillation applications.

These are just some common examples, and circuits are actually very diverse in type and complexity. The components and topology in the circuit will vary based on specific needs and applications, enabling a variety of functionality and performance.

Review Editor: Huang Fei


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